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The lazy entrepreneur 

Aime Ayrehart from Ninja HR writes about being a lazy entrepreneur

The title is a little cheeky.  My reaction to people telling me I could make so much more money if I worked more hours.

I nodded, then ignored them. If I can live a fabulous life and only work 16 hours a week, what more can money buy me? 

I’m writing this sitting on the beach in Scarborough.  The air is warm and calm and feels like spring.  The sound of the waves crashing is gentle, and I can hear the birds singing contentedly. 

Yesterday was an entirely different experience. There was wind, rain, and even hail. It was exhilarating and exhausting.

Life as a solepreneur

I have to be in the right head space to be creative.  Calm, playful, relaxed.  And being a solepreneur requires a huge amount of creativity.  Partly because my speciality as the employment genie is to solve impossible work-based problems, which each require an entirely novel approach, but also because running a business requires us to design products and endless social media and networking.

But life, emotions and the journey of a solepreneur are more like the sea than a motorway.  Endless opportunities but at times exhausting and scary.

Embracing creativity

In an attempt to fit into a man’s world, most women have tried to even everything out to be consistent and professional.  To always be able to deliver the same thing and to control our environment rather than live in harmony with it.

But ignoring the seasons and the ebb and flow of our emotions has led to increasing levels of conflict at work, at home and in the world generally. Not to mention it’s created global warming.

Noticing the ebbs and flows

Few people who know me would doubt I can be strong and confident, do maths and law and lead – typically masculine attributes.  And I’m glad I have these skills as part of my arsenal.

But my real breakthroughs in both business and my personal life are where I have begun to notice the ebbs and flows and more gently acknowledge them in myself and others.

When people ask me how I am, and I reply, “Fabulous,” they seem somewhat shocked – and of course, I have bad days.  But it’s true I’m in a good place.

Mmm now I’ve written this blog, I might go and make myself a hot chocolate and read for a bit.  Such a terrible life indeed 😊

Aime Ayrehart being a lazy entrepreneur after writing a guest blog

About Aime

Aime Ayrehart is a bestselling author, founder of a trade union, and offers HR crisis management through Ninja HR.  But her real passion is supporting female business owners to flourish.  She started a female-run collaborative that has launched the Entrepreneurs Mindset Development Tool to help identify strengths and areas for development in a kind way, and through the Sasspreneur Club, we offer unique, cost-effective and accessible support to help you flourish – however that looks for you. 

Ninja HR

Entrepreneurs Mindset Development Tool

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What do beginners need to know about what you do?

What do beginners need to know about what you do?

You’re an expert at what you do, so it might be hard to remember when you were a beginner. However, when new people see your content, a few of them will probably be completely new to the kind of work you do. It’s worth thinking about ways to talk to them, so ask yourself: what do beginners need to know about what you do?

What knowledge helps people work with you?

Does your business help beginners, or is there an entry point that makes your working relationship easier? For example, selling a product is often quicker and easier if your customers know exactly what they need.

I don’t do marketing strategy, so I love it when people come to me with plans or already know their customers well. I can help with topics, but they’ve done the groundwork and know what they want their marketing to achieve.

What information can you share?

If your business offers training, your content can share your knowledge and give your customers a taste of the training they’ll receive. Even if you don’t train people, your marketing can educate them about what will help them work with you. For example, I talk about ways to get to know your ideal customer even though it’s not part of my core service.

Sharing the basics in a short guide or quick tips can also give your audience the confidence to contact you without worrying they’ll sound stupid or ask silly questions.

Use lead magnets

Lead magnets encourage people to sign up for your email list and can work in the same way as the rest of your content. A lead magnet doesn’t have to be complicated; the shorter, the better. The idea is to offer your audience valuable information that gives them a quick win when they put it into practice.

Creating a lead magnet that helps beginners who may want to work with you also means you only spend time emailing people who could be genuine customers.

Create products

You don’t always have to give information away for free. You can offer products even if you offer a one-to-one service like I do. For example, if you have a craft business, you might write about different craft techniques, equipment and how to get started. You can also create a beginner’s kit with a simple project, materials, and instructions that help customers learn and build confidence.

My version of this is in my eBooks, which include ideas for your content marketing and your Christmas posts.

Team up with other businesses

This is one of my favourite ways to work. Collaborating with businesses related to yours but that don’t offer the same service helps you reach a wider audience. You can share guest blogs on each other’s websites and social media feeds, organise joint events, or refer your clients to each other.

This approach can make your clients’ lives easier. If you’re a wedding photographer with a network of other wedding professionals, recommending people can save your clients time and stress. I work with marketing consultants and trainers, graphic designers, and web designers so our clients don’t have to build a whole team from scratch when they start a new project.

If you have a plan but lack the time or energy to turn it into new marketing content, I can help. I’ll write blogs, posts, emails, and whatever else you need to engage your audience. Head to my shop for eBooks with marketing inspiration. If you’d like to chat about how it works, you can book a call here.

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Can you create a new angle on an old marketing idea?

Image shows me sitting at my laptop, coming up with a new marketing angle on an old idea.

If you’ve been creating marketing content for a while, you might feel like you’ve said it all. (I know I sometimes do.) However, your existing content can be a great source of new ideas. Here are some ways to find a new marketing angle on an old idea.

Revisit an old post

What do you see when you look back at your old blog or social media posts? Do they make you cringe because you’ve changed or learned more about your audience since you created them? You might find posts discussing issues that are still relevant but where your advice has changed. You can base a whole new post on the same topic, sharing the knowledge you’ve gained since then, and it’ll still be relevant to your audience.

Update a resources post

Sharing the tools you use can help your audience in multiple ways. Say you run a craft business selling tools and materials; showing people what you use yourself can help beginners and improvers. A hairdresser can share products and tools to help customers maintain their locks between appointments. I talk about software such as Grammarly, which helps me with my grammar, so you can use it when you write your own posts.

Expand a subheading

If you’ve ever written a post with some quick and easy tips, review it to see if you can expand on one of the subheadings. For example, some of my posts on writing a blog mention creating a good headline to catch people’s attention as a subheading. I expanded it into a full post on ways to do that. (https://www.kirstyfrancewrites.co.uk/write-a-headline-tips/)

You may have kept things short and sweet for a tips post, but expanding a subheading lets you share more of your expertise. You can also link between the two posts to improve your SEO.

Have industry updates changed how you work?

Looking back at old content, you might find that your advice has changed because of external changes in your industry. ChatGPT has impacted marketing, so you could create a post discussing the issues or recommending ways to use the technology. (https://www.kirstyfrancewrites.co.uk/ai-help-content-writing/)

There may also have been changes in the law that impact your customers and that you can educate them about. Legal changes might also mean people need to review their will or investments. You can contact existing clients, but sharing updates in your marketing could attract new ones.

Create new case studies

Case studies are a great way to show potential customers how you work and showcase the results you’ve achieved for others. When you review existing case studies, you might find that your process has changed with time or that you haven’t talked about a service that has grown in popularity. Creating new case studies with more recent clients ensures your content stays up to date. If you have business clients who are happy to go public and share that they’ve worked with you, it can be a great marketing opportunity for you both.

If you have a page full of ideas but lack the time or energy to turn them into new marketing content, I can help. I’ll write blogs, posts, emails, and whatever else you need to engage your audience. I’ll even look at your existing content to create new marketing ideas. If you’d like to chat to find out how it works, you can book a call here. Or, use the form below to sign up for monthly content writing tips straight to your inbox.

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How to use your FAQs for new content ideas

Image shows question marks representing FAQs to help you create new content ideas.

If you’ve ever run out of ideas, think about the questions you’re asked most often and write a blog or social media post to answer them. Your FAQs can be a great source of ideas, as if people are asking you in person, they’re likely searching for answers online, too.

Here are a few ways to turn your FAQs into new content ideas.

Expand the answers to your existing FAQs

Do you already have an FAQ page on your website? If not, think about creating one. The rest of this post should help you come up with ideas if you’re drawing a blank. If you’ve already got a page with short answers, you can share them as social media posts or expand them into a longer blog post or article.

For example, there may be a story behind why you take a particular approach, or you could expand on a process to let people know what to expect.

Link to your FAQ page

Linking between pages on your website is excellent for SEO and gives your visitors a choice about how much they want to read. For some people, a short answer might be enough, and they don’t want to wade through several paragraphs to find out what they want to know. Others might be interested in a more in-depth answer, so you can link from your FAQ page to a blog post to give them more information.

Check your client meeting notes

I make notes of every client meeting so I can remember what questions they asked, what information I gave them and what I need to remember to send afterwards. Sometimes, a potential customer might not get in touch because they’re afraid of asking a silly question. Answering the queries you’ve already had helps them to relax because they know what to expect.

If you don’t speak with new clients one-on-one, review your emails or messages to see what comes up regularly.

What do you hear at networking events?

You may have noticed that I network a lot. I always keep my ears open to understand what people struggle with because I can include details that show I understand my customers’ lives and provide tailored information about how I can help them.

Whether you attend in-person events or network online via Zoom or social media groups, see what questions and comments come up to see if they inspire a new topic idea.

Create a knowledge base

Sharing your knowledge is incredibly powerful as it shows your customers the benefits of your service and that you know what you’re talking about. It can also save you time. If a new client comes to you knowing that they need a particular product or service, it means you don’t have to answer lots of questions to help them make the right choice.

You could write about different products or explain how something works. For example, I write for an insurance broker and we create lots of different knowledge posts about how life cover or health insurance works. Their clients get to know the basics and then come to them for detailed advice.

If you’ve got a page full of ideas but lack the time or energy to turn them into new marketing content, I can help.  I’ll write blogs, posts, emails and whatever else you need to engage your audience. If you’d like a chat to find out how it works, you can book a call here. Or, use the form below to sign up for monthly content writing tips straight to your inbox.

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What happens in families when winning is too important?

Guest blog when winning is too important

Winning in families can be defined in many different ways. For some, just getting through the day is a win, but many parents see winning as the recognition and glory that comes from the certificates, medals, trophies and accolades that result from being the best in class at something. This might be in an academic or sporting context, or in the arts or one of the many other recreational activities our children participate in.

A healthy dose of a winning mentality in families is good if it incentivises effort, focus and motivation. Sometimes pressure can be a catalyst for improvement, and a bit of natural adrenalin is a good thing; after all, that is how we are wired as humans. But what happens when this spins out of control and winning is too important?

As a parent who has experienced being in the highly competitive environment of elite sport, I have seen first-hand how families can fall on the wrong side of the winning mentality. Sport can bring out the best and the worst in parents, and many of the same issues translate into the much broader context of family life. Worryingly, some parents can see making packed lunches as competitive!

Why, as a culture, have we become so obsessed with winning?

Often, it’s becausewe are craving certaintyfor our children. We are anxious for them to succeed in a competitive world. How do we know they are going to ‘make it’? How do we know they are good enough to pass their exams or get selected for a team? What if they fail?

We want to know our children will have a happy, healthy and successful future, so we look for things to reassure us and give us confidence that they are on the right path. This generally involves benchmarking them academically, physically or emotionally against their peers. ‘Comparisonitis’ is a scourge of modern society, exacerbated by the nation’s obsession with social media, which permeates into our conscious and unconscious mind. We look at our own world through the filter of other people’s images and information about their seemingly amazing lives. It’s very easy to see our children’s success or failure as a reflection of who we are or what we are lacking in compared to others.

We have also developed an impatient culture where we are not prepared to wait for anything, and this also spills over into family life. We are impatient for results and unwilling to accept that along our child’s developmental journey sometimes making learnings and making gains takes time. Children should be celebrated when they begin something new. No one starts off being amazing at anything. It may sound counter-intuitive, but good things often develop from making it through tough times, and bad things can develop from too much pleasure too soon.

What happens to parents when winning is too important?

When the pressure of winning or the need to see our children succeed builds, we can start to lose our natural perspective about the things that really matter. We might start to get over-critical of our children or of ourselves, or maybe if we see small signs of progress, we begin to believe our children are going to be super-stars, irrespective of the reality of what they are really capable of.

The weight of expectation can weigh heavily on a young child, and they will pick up on this pressure not only via what we say but in terms of how we behave around them as they pick up on non-verbal cues, such as our body language.  Before you know it, the thing they were doing for fun becomes a chore, you’re dealing with tears and tantrums, and they want to quit. Sometimes they will start to hide their true feelings as they don’t want to disappoint us or be told that how they feel is not acceptable. This is a dangerous path. Although setting the bar high can be good as it teaches children that they can do more than they think they are capable of, expecting too much and craving perfection is demoralising.

What happens in families when winning is too important?

How does a parents’ need to win impact our children?

Sometimes the need for our children to succeed comes from issues from our own past. If we unintentionally use our children to heal our emotional wounds or issues about failure in our life, then it really is becoming all about us and not about them. It may show up as over-invested behaviour on the sideline at a sporting fixture when parents argue with the ref or make their small children feel ashamed or useless. This undoes all the good that sport has to offer. Children have an inner compass just like we do, and they know when they’ve messed up. They don’t need us to tell them.

Motivated by the need for our children to max out their opportunities to develop winning ways, ‘helicopter parenting’ may take over in the form of overprotecting and controlling behaviour.   It’s an attempt to clear the path of anything that might challenge children or distract them from the ‘winning’ things we think they should focus on, and it prevents children from facing tough times or experiencing failure. It is hugely counter-productive as it deprives our children of resilience-building opportunities, which are a rich seam of character-building potential for the long term.  

Alternative definitions of ‘winning’

Winning should also be about being rewarded for consistently making an effort, trying new things, learning how to lose, being kind, respecting others, showing humility, having fun, making new friends, overcoming setbacks, being teachable, being resilient, knowing when to say no. (There are many more.)

A more positive and more rounded parental perspective around winning and losing will develop our young children into happier, healthier, more confident individuals.It is down to us as parental role models to set the tone of what winning really means by establishing a culture at home that we demonstrate through our words and our actions. Remember, children do not do what we say, they do what we do. They have been mirroring our behaviour since the day they first smiled back at us as a baby.

10 Practical tips

Focus on the right stuff

Some of the most together children I know are raised in houses that are a mess, by parents who turn up late and wear mismatched socks. When parenting life becomes overwhelming, perhaps they knew what to let go and what to put first. Kindness matters. Socks…not so much.

Be patient  

Lots of highly performing children were not always great as children develop physically and emotionally at different times. I have seen children who were timid and bottom of the class excel and achieve in their teens. (I have also seen superstar performers at 7 fade away to nothing.)

Do not assume they will want to follow in your footsteps

Children have different genes and different environmental influences. They are not you. Just because you were good at something does not mean they will be.

School doesn’t suit everyone

Accept that some children never fit into the sausage machine of school life, (my own daughter being one of them) and may excel in the real world beyond the confines of the classroom.

Take a break

Taking a holiday or just changing your environment is so important to reset your perspective when everything gets too much.

Establish boundaries

Everyone needs time to relax and just ‘be’, without the pressure of having to achieve anything.

Check in  

If your children are obsessing about highly competitive activities are they doing this for the love of the activity, for you, or for themselves?

Focus on effort not on the end result                                                                                                    

Always ensure children know you don’t think any less of them because they have failed at something. What matters is that they gave their best effort.

Build resilience

Never do anything for a child that the child can do for themselves; but don’t promote heroic individual strength of character either as they need to know you are there for them if times get tough. Expose them to as many varied opportunities to develop coping mechanisms as you can.

Use your intuition

As a parent you know your children better than anyone, and if something they are working towards doesn’t feel right and is making them unhappy then stop. Even if it works against the grain of securing their ‘winning future’ don’t worry, it will often be for the best. Be aware that our need to be certain of their future lowers our ability to put faith in our own resources and use our gut instinct. 

Conclusion

No one can predict the outcome of a child’s future and whether they will succeed or fail at anything. However hard we try, however brilliant our advice and support is as parents, however good their teachers or coaches are, and whatever they say they will guarantee, the only thing we know for sure about ‘winning’, in whatever way you define it, is nothing is certain. So you might as well relax about it.

All we can do is create the optimum conditions and environment under which our children can flourish. Focus on getting the basics right – quality nutrition and regular hydration, love and support with a focus on fun, a good routine and a well organized environment at home. That is winning.

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What marketing makes you cringe?

Good marketing should be memorable, but what if you remember it for all the wrong reasons? Thinking about how some adverts miss the mark can help you avoid making the same mistakes. So, what marketing makes you cringe and why?

Are you being shouted at?

Have you ever watched ‘Horrible Histories’? It’s classic kids’ TV because it also includes jokes for the grown-ups. The ‘shouty man’ character was the perfect parody of adverts that shout at you to make sales. Those types of adverts may have disappeared, but marketing can still make you cringe if you feel you’re being lectured rather than persuaded. You might have something important to say, but meeting your audience where they are is better than trying to shout them down.

Too many clichés

I posted on social media recently, asking people to share their least favourite marketing buzzwords with me. ‘Journey’ came up a lot. It’s not a bad word in itself; it’s just become a cliché because of the number of people using it on reality TV shows.

Avoiding cliché can be tricky. Sometimes, how you phrase something tells your audience what to expect and can be comforting. Each industry has its own words and language patterns, and it can be hard to know when something tips over the edge from familiar to overused. Following other businesses in your niche to see what reactions their content gets can help.

Outdated attitudes

Did you know that the Advertising Standards Agency now has regulations so they can ban harmful gender stereotypes in advertising? We’ve definitely come a long way. A few decades ago, print adverts saw women as either decorative or only good for doing the housework (and suggested that domestic violence was acceptable if she made a mistake). You’d only ever see straight couples and white faces.

Modern adverts are more diverse, but some stereotypes remain. A GAP clothing advert was heavily criticised for suggesting boys are ‘scholars’ while girls are ‘social butterflies’. When you write new content, think about your assumptions about your audience and whether they’re accurate.

Ask whether it’s meant for you

If someone’s marketing makes you cringe, consider whether you’re the intended audience. My kids aren’t teenagers yet, but I still hear the odd word that makes me wonder whether we still speak the same language.

On the other hand, what if you’re a business’s ideal customer, and they’re still driving you away? Are they making uneducated guesses about your life or what you need? To avoid it, try using social media or networking events to ask questions and learn more about what your future customers care about.

Is it inconsistent?

Consistent marketing helps your customers get to know, like and trust you. That doesn’t mean you have to fall into a cosy rut, but it helps if you keep your tone of voice, values and branding consistent so people recognise you.

If a brand you know and love suddenly pops up with something wildly out of character, you might lose trust in them because you suspect they’re going off in a new direction that isn’t for you. That may be a problem if it’s a business you’ve only discovered recently, as inconsistency can prevent you from getting to know them.

If you want to avoid writing content that makes your customers cringe, I can help.  I’ll write blogs, posts, emails and whatever else you need to engage your audience. If you’d like a chat to find out how it works, you can book a call here.

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Do you know your marketing tone of voice?

Do you know your marketing tone of voice?

Smaller businesses like ours don’t tend to have teams of branding experts analysing our target market, imagery and language to keep everything consistent. We’re more likely to write our own content, so it sounds like us and our customers feel like they already know us. Being yourself in your marketing is great, but understanding how your language affects your customers and what it says about your business lets you tweak things to make your marketing tone of voice more effective.

The best way to do this is to look at other people’s content and ask yourself a few questions to work out why you like (or hate) it. Here are some questions to ask to get you started.

How does it make you feel?

When you read a social media post or blog or watch an advert, ask yourself how it makes you feel. Does it lift your mood or spur you on to solve a problem? Does the language make you feel relaxed or on edge?

The way you position yourself in relation to your audience is important. Speaking to them as equals is great, but sometimes you must show your expertise too. A florist and a financial adviser can both be friendly, but they differ in how they talk about their expertise.

What change do they offer?

Helping your audience understand the changes your product or service can bring makes them more likely to buy, even if those changes are pretty small. Holiday adverts show happy families having fun, while Christmas ones have people smiling as they open the perfect gift. When you see marketing that you like, ask yourself why. Does it show something you want? If you find an advert irritating or indifferent to it, consider whether you’re the target audience.

What else are they selling?

This can be a tricky one to work out. Most marketing shows tangible benefits, but there are often intangible ones as well. This usually depends on a brand’s market position. A clothes shop selling fast, affordable fashion will market itself very differently from a luxury brand. The quality of each item and the price tag may differ, but that’s not all. Marketing for luxury goods aims to make you feel like your social status will improve if you buy from them.

Did they take you by surprise?

Some businesses make themselves stand out by doing something unexpected. If you think an industry is boring, they make it fun, or perhaps they make a process easy where it’s been long-winded before.

Marketing like this sometimes follows one convention (like showing a product) and breaks another (by doing it in an unexpected way). Haribo adverts show the sweets, but they stand out because they feature adult actors speaking like children, so it sticks in your memory.

Compare content from different sources

Looking at a few adverts or marketing posts helps you understand how brands present themselves to different audiences. Marketing that irritates you can be as helpful as content you love. When you compare brands, look at the language they use. Does a luxury brand use different words from a budget one?

Looking at other people’s marketing also helps you decide where you fit in the marketplace and what that means for your marketing. You’ll use different language to attract cash-rich and time-poor customers than you will if your audience is the complete opposite.

If you try this out, let me know how you get on. I’d love to hear from you.

If you want to find the best version of your marketing tone of voice, I can help.  I’ll write blogs, posts, emails and whatever else you need to engage your audience. If you’d like a chat to find out how it works, you can book a call here. Or, use the form below to sign up for monthly content writing tips straight to your inbox.

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Five tips to help you get to know your ideal customer

This is me recording videos to share with my ideal customer.

When you get to know your ideal customer, you can write content that speaks to them. Good marketing creates a connection between you and your audience. If you try to write for everyone, you end up with bland content that doesn’t connect with anyone. Here are my top five tips to help you get to know your ideal customer so you can start writing for them.

Who do you work with now?

If you’ve already got a few customers, think about them first. Who do you love working with, and who would you rather be rid of? Think about any common features the two groups share. It could be their age, interests or how they speak to you. If you communicate face to face or via email, are there differences in how you talk to them? Using the same language in your marketing helps you attract more people you like and repel the ones you don’t.

How does your business help people?

Over time, you’ll discover more about how you help your customers achieve their aspirations or overcome challenges.

Some of the benefits of your product or service might not be immediately obvious. For example, you might sell gorgeous jewellery that your customers love to wear or give as gifts. However, they might also come back because you help them choose the right gift or offer a relaxed shopping experience. It helps you add depth to your content as your ideal customers feel seen.

Do you serve people at a particular life stage?

Creating the right content can be easier if your business helps people when they’ve reached a particular life stage. They might be about to retire, have a baby or start a business. However, it’s still important to understand other details about their life. Even if people are at a similar life stage, they might approach it differently. Older people might be looking forward to an active retirement or have health concerns. The language you use for each will be different.

What does your ideal customer care about?

Understanding what your customers care about and why they choose your business helps you target the right people. If you want to educate, it’s easier if you can connect with things they already value. For example, if your fitness business attracts customers who want to improve their health but still have the odd takeaway, your marketing can make them feel welcome. If you’re a financial planner, your customers might not see the benefit in buying life insurance, but they will care about taking care of their family when they’re gone.

How do they spend their time?

Knowing how your ideal customers spend their time helps you in a few ways. It helps you put your content where they’ll see it, whether online or offline. If they’re busy juggling lots of tasks, you can decide when to share something short and snappy and consider when they might have time to read something longer.

Finally, it helps you choose the right language. The way you talk to people who love luxury living will be very different from the language you use for people who prefer being at home in their pyjamas.

If you want to write in a way that shows your customers you understand them, I can help.  I’ll write blogs, posts, emails and whatever else you need to engage your audience and encourage them to get in touch. If you’d like a chat to find out how it works, you can book a call here. Or, use the form below to sign up for monthly content writing tips straight to your inbox.

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Five ways to show the before and after in your marketing

Image shows a woman sitting on a beach. How do you show the before and after in your marketing?

Good marketing shows your customers that you understand where they are now and where they could be with your help. Showing them the before and after can be really powerful. It can be easy to show a transformation in a couple of pictures, but it’s not the only way.

Read on to discover how your writing can show your customers the before and after.

Feeling better

When you think about ‘before and after,’ the first thing that probably springs to mind is a pair of photos showing someone before and after losing weight or having a makeover. If your business offers a physical transformation, using images is a great way to showcase your results. However, your words can show your audience more. For example, you could talk about all the things your clients can do now that they couldn’t do before, like going for a long walk or running around after their children.

The change you offer might not be visible, but it can dramatically improve someone’s health, like physiotherapy. Describing your results or sharing customer testimonials lets your readers understand the benefits.

Making life better

What do you give your customers that they didn’t have before? There’s more than one way to bring practical change into someone’s life. Do you make tedious but necessary tasks easier or save them time or money? Think about what that change might look like for your customers and how it helps them achieve their goals.

For example, a travel agent might help people get a family holiday on a budget or find the perfect relaxing break for a wealthy CEO with no time for research. Your knowledge and research help both, but in different ways, so you can tailor your content to suit.

Greater self-worth

Facing a challenge can be frustrating but can also impact how you feel about yourself. A new parent struggling to get their baby to sleep will experience many different emotions and might conclude that they’re a terrible parent, even though they’re nothing of the kind.

Finding the right help and guidance can help people feel more competent and in control of their situation. Create content that shows people you see their struggles and can help them.

Show the emotions

Even if you don’t transform the way someone feels about themselves, you might still bring about an emotional change. A good café offering a hot cup of tea can provide a few minutes of calm on a busy day. Even online ordering can ease someone’s stress, knowing they don’t have to find time to go to a shop.

If you save people time, think about what they might do with it instead. I often picture a business owner still writing their blog when they’d rather be reading the kids a bedtime story. What does that look like for your customers?

Better relationships

If you’re a marriage counsellor, you could literally save relationships, but other businesses could, too. Maybe saving someone time gives them more hours to spend with their loved ones instead of being ships that pass in the night. Perhaps you sell really great presents so your customers always know where to shop first.

If you want to write in a way that shows your customers the before and after, I can help.  I’ll write blogs, posts, emails and whatever else you need to engage your audience and encourage them to get in touch. If you’d like a chat to find out how it works, you can book a call here. Or, use the form below to sign up for monthly content writing tips straight to your inbox.

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How YMCA Burton helps the local community

Following the Christmas festivities, the new year can feel a little daunting, not only as we prepare for the year ahead but also after a very busy and expensive time with presents, Christmas dinner and spending time with family and friends. For a lot of people, this is a time that they look forward to in the year, as it’s filled with a lot of joy. However, for others, it can be a difficult time either because they’re alone, struggling with their mental health, are grieving, or perhaps they don’t have a safe place to call home.

How we help

At YMCA Burton, we’re here to help anyone in our local community who needs our support in a time of crisis 24/7, 365 days of the year. Whether it be homelessness, needing an emergency food parcel, wanting to rebuild strained relationships in the home through mediation, needing affordable, good quality second-hand furniture or just having a safe place to have a cuppa, a chat and a hot meal, we are available at YMCA Burton to support in any way that we possibly can.

The heart of our services, Reconnect, which houses 31 units of accommodation, our Foodbank as well as our Family Mediation service and Counselling service. Opposite Asda on James Street in Burton on Trent.
The heart of our services, Reconnect, which houses 31 units of accommodation, our Foodbank as well as our Family Mediation service and Counselling service. Opposite Asda on James Street in Burton on Trent.

There’s more demand than ever

With a strong reputation in the town of Burton-on-Trent for over 135 years, YMCA Burton has faced its highest demand to date across all of its services in 2023. Waiting lists have formed for the first time ever within our Family Mediation Service, the foodbank service has experienced its highest distribution figures in its 23-year history, and our accommodation has constantly been full. It reflects the incredible need for this type of support across the local community as well as the challenges that a lot of individuals and families are facing in their daily lives. This is the harsh reality at the moment, and without us, thousands of individuals and families in and around Burton would be in desperate need of support.

How you can support us

At YMCA Burton, we change lives. However, we can’t do what we do without the help and support of others, as donations are needed more than ever. There are multiple ways that you can support us, depending on the best way for you. This can look like a one-off monetary donation, you could become a monthly donor, giving whatever you can each month to continuously support our work and services. There are also options to donate items of food to our foodbank, leave a gift in your will or perhaps choose to become a volunteer. Whatever way you choose to support us will make a massive difference to our charity and ensure that we can continue to remain a central charity in our local community and help to change lives.

To find out more about our charity and our impact on our local community, head to our website: https://burtonymca.org/. Furthermore, if you’d like to help make a difference to someone’s life today, please contact our Fundraising & Comms team via fundraising@burtonymca.org / 07754045869

On behalf of all of us at YMCA Burton, thank you very much!